For the fourth week of the Political Studies Program, we will continue our exploration of the American regime, with a focus on the Black experience.

One seminar will consider the question of slavery during the American Founding, while another will explore the contributions of African Americans – from Douglass to Washington, Du Bois, and Malcolm X – to American political thought.

Image Credit: Statue of Frederick Douglass, Cam Pac Swire via Flickr | Frederick Douglass, an American Slave 01, Byronv2 via Flickr

Diana Schaub on the Life and Political Thought of Frederick Douglass

Faculty

Thomas Merrill

Thomas Merrill is an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University. He is the author of Hume and the Politics of Enlightenment. He is also the co-editor of three edited volumes, including The Political Thought of the Civil War. He was a senior research analyst for the President’s Council on Bioethics during the George W. Bush Administration.

Diana Schaub

Diana J. Schaub is Professor of Political Science at Loyola University Maryland and a member of the Hoover Institution’s task force on The Virtues of a Free Society. From 2004 to 2009 she was a member of the President’s Council on Bioethics.

Preview the Syllabus by Week/Session

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